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Fieldwork

Anthropology, JST Video

Anthro 101 | What is cultural anthropology?

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Hi everyone, I am back with one new video (for a brand new series) dedicated to anthropology.
This is going to be a challenging experiment for me, because talking about anthropology means to analyze the origin of this discipline, its developments and how it interacts, today, with the rest of human sciences and politics.

However, I am thrilled to give it a try, and today I want to begin with a brief intro, a very first definition, a quick answer to the question “What is anthropology?”

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Field 2014, Field Journal

Meeting an Itako: Aoyama-san

Reading Time: 7 minutes

After the first meeting with Nakamura-san, I knew I had to meet more itako in order to have a better understanding of their activity, their life and their world. Since today there are very few itako (probably not even ten) I had to patiently call the phone numbers I had, hoping some of these ladies would agree to meet with me. After a long search and some rejections, I could convince two of them to have an interview with me; one of them is Aoyama-san, an eighty-year-old lady living with her husband in Tsugaru.

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Okazaki for Beginners
Field 2008, Field Journal

Okazaki for beginners

Reading Time: 4 minutes

As far as I could perceive at that time, Okazaki is a medium-sized city, laying on wavy hills and crossed by the river Yahagi. Being used to the italian and european cities, the first thing that came to my mind was to find the city center, a sort of core (the most historical, or the most populated, I don’t know…) where the ordinary city life would be articulated: this is a mistake I did several times, even later in my trip.

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first days in Okazaki
Field 2008, Field Journal

First days in Okazaki

Reading Time: 4 minutes

I received instructions to call the school once in Okazaki, in order to have the school shuttle to pick me up. Let me repeat it. I had to speak at the phone (a huge effort for me), in Japanese, after what was more than one whole day without sleep (around 36 hours). I guess truly young people don’t have problems with this; I had. Mostly with the three things combined.

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